MIND-BOGGLING HIKER RIDDLE ft Anne Wojcicki



Check back tomorrow for the hiker riddle answer & for the next riddle!
Try Skillshare at http://skl.sh/physicsgirl
I ask Anne Wojcicki, founder and CEO of 23andMe to answer some logic and physics riddles. Yes, it’s mean and fun.

By the way, Physics Girl has previously been sponsored by 23andMe. 23andMe did not sponsor or influence the content of this video! Though Dianna has followed Anne’s work for a while, and her kids are fans of Physics Girl, so the rest is history.

Creator: Dianna Cowern
Editor: Jabril Ashe
Animator: Kyle Norby
Thanks to: Anne Wojcicki, the 23andMe staff and Dan Walsh

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Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

31 thoughts on “MIND-BOGGLING HIKER RIDDLE ft Anne Wojcicki

  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    They TAKE your DNA, and USE IT, ANY way they want!!! You've been WARNED!!!!

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    anywhere on the ring that is (2pi+1)/2pi miles north of the south pole

    Edit:
    Anywhere on any ring north of the south pole that is defined as 1+1/n2pi miles, where n is any integer greater than zero. Your total number of laps around the south pole would be n. The distance north of the pole that your circle around the pole lies would be 1/n2pi miles.

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    my answer to the first one was half a mile west of the prime meridian

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    Guilherme Soares Exactly, there are an infinite number of possible point a locations near the south pole plus 1 at the north. I love it!

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    So reading the comments obviously reveals the other answer, which is very clever, but I've come up with another solution. It's questionable, and kind of maybe breaks some unspoken rules, but I figured I'd share it anyway. Even if you don't think it counts, I think there's still value in coming up with a creative, if imperfect, solution.

    So my solution is such that you can begin at any point on the earth, except within one mile of the south pole because you obviously can't move a mile south from there.
    You simply travel south a mile. From there, you take advantage of the fact that the earth rotates from west to east, and just stand there until the earth has rotated you one mile eastward, and then travel the one mile north again. Ta-dah!

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    I heard this riddle as a schoolkid many years ago but the riddle went thus:

    A hunter leaves home heading due south for an hour and picks up the trail of a bear heading due east. After an hour the hunter catches up with the bear, shoots it, and heads due north. After an hour the hunter is home again. What colour was the bear?

    Great for long car rides, campfires, etc.

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    Any point that is 6,960' 8" from the south pole fits the bill, or ~1.3 miles.

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    Near the south pole, after you go south, you must end up at "x"where walking 1 miles east make you do a perfect circle, x Pi = 1mile

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    If a flea was on my testicle and went 1 inches down. 1 inches left. And then 7 inches up. Where would it be?

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    I'm like so proud of myself, I figured it out! I know it was an easy one but I'm bad at riddles, let me have this. lol

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    The mile south, mile east, mile north puzzle has more answers than the north pole.

    There is the locus of points 1 and 1 over pi miles from the south pole too, where you walk towards the south pole for a mile, round the south pole for a mile and back to your start position for a mile.

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    You can start 1 1/2π north of the south pole, and 1 1/4π, 1 1/6π, 1 1/8π, 1 1/10π, 1 1/12π, and all other mixed fractions such that the whole number and numerator are 1, and the denominator is a multiple of 2π.

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    Solution Idea, The second option would start at a point one mile north of a point along a one mile circumference circle that is centered around the south pole. At that starting point they walk south one mile to the circle. They walk east along the one mile circumference circle and end up back at the same point on earth. Then finally they walk north back to their original starting point. Great riddle. Simple yet thought provoking. Joke: I don't think flat earthers would be able to figure this out. I mean they could but they would see it as a pointless endeavor and a way to brainwash people.

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    (we're still working with miles as units, right? so) you need to start at a distance 1+C from the south pole, such that C is the distance to the south pole that would be the radius of a circle around the south pole that measures 1 mile (C*2Pi=1) from that point, which without doing the math is about a mile and a bit, you walk your mile south, then as you walk a mile east (or west) you describe a circle around the pole, then you walk your mile north along the same path you came south. draw a huge nazca figure in the snow in the shape of a pin, with the head around the pole and the tip wherever you started.

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    I think you cant go South from The North pole, because we cant define NSEW directions on the poles, since theres not a merdidian line defined

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  • November 14, 2017 at 11:14 am
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    Can't really go "south" from the north pole, what direction would it be ?
    It really is any direction. So a better riddle would be : go straight in any direction for a mile, then east for a mile then north for another one etc…

    Reply

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