Passo dello Stelvio (Prato) – Cycling Inspiration & Education



As the highest road pass in Italy, standing proud at 2,758 metres, the Passo dello Stelvio needs very little introduction. From Prato its 48 bends carve their way up the mountain in what appears to be an endless road towards heaven, constantly switching back and forth the higher you climb. This was the final ascent of the day after two days in and around the Eastern and Italian Alps, we had a long transfer over to the Dolomites to look forward to but before doing so one last (big) mission to complete. Although warm and bright in the valley when we started the clouds were thickening up above and temperature dropping fast as the sun dipped its head on the distant horizon. Will we make it to the top before dark was the question on everyone’s mind? Watch now to find out. Chasing daylight, climbing mountains, what a feeling, this is definitely why we ride!

Length: 24.3km
Summit: 2,758m
Elevation gain: 1,808m
Average gradient: 7.4%
Max gradient: 14%
Ridden in September

We hope you enjoyed this video. For more help and advice visit our website at http://thecolcollective.com and don’t forget to sign up to our free newsletter to get the latest updates and become part of the col community.

If you like what you see then please help share our story with your friends and fellow riders, get in touch on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, subscribe to The Col Collective YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/TheColCol… or leave us a comment below the video. Our main goal is to try and bring that little moment of mountain magic to as many cyclists as we can, inspiring, educating and guiding you to the summit along the way.

Thank you for watching. Stay safe and see you again soon my friends.

……oh, and one last thing……GRAZIE MILLE STELVIO! You are INCREDIBLE! 🙂

Peace & pedals.

Mike Cotty
The Col Collective

Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/TheColCollective?sub_confirmation=1
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheColCollective
Twitter: https://twitter.com/colcollective
Instagram: http://instagram.com/thecolcollective
Google+: https://www.google.com/+TheColCollective

source

Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

20 thoughts on “Passo dello Stelvio (Prato) – Cycling Inspiration & Education

  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    Going to ride it next week, already getting sweaty hands 😄 great video

    Reply
  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    Muy cheveres los videos, imponentes como siempre los paisajes, sería bueno poder traducirlos.

    Reply
  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    wow, definitely inspirational, awesome climbing technique…when i get down to a decent cycling weight my dream is to ride one of the iconic climbs you've covered so well in your videos… subscribed!

    Reply
  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    Incredible video! This video had really inspired me! I have two questions;

    1. What tyre width do you use?
    2. What is your diet? Vegan? Omnivore? Paleo?

    Many thanks!

    Reply
  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    Good on Ya, Mike!
    Question for ya, though;
    "You're always out of the saddle. Contador does 20min. Are you trying to emulate his prowess?"
    I'm but a mere mortal. 😐

    Reply
  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    For me there is one key-moment missing from the climb:
    The moment when you see the last "wall" for the first time – this is really breathtaking, because it looks surreal, when you have the last 600 meters of elvenation – litterally- in front of you.

    Reply
  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    Air is so thin at the top I had trouble breathing (in bed) even though I was alone! What was it like coming down – surely the bike's brakes could not sustain that much hard use?

    Reply
  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    As for the temperature drop, you should take the cycle of day temperature into your consideration. If you start in the morning, temperature drop will be less than 18 degrees. On my first ride up, temperature drop was just 6 to 8 degrees. If you start later in the day, temperature drop might be larger, i.e. if the sun has gone over its peak already.

    Reply
  • September 1, 2017 at 7:01 pm
    Permalink

    As for the temperature drop, you should take the cycle of day temperature into your consideration. If you start in the morning, temperature drop will be less than 18 degrees. On my first ride up, temperature drop was just 6 to 8 degrees. If you start later in the day, temperature drop might be larger, i.e. if the sun has gone over its peak already.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *