Natural Selection & Sexual Selection: An Illustrated Introduction



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How does evolution happen? Through a gradual process called selection. Individuals that are better equipped to survive and reproduce pass those traits to their offspring. These “selected” changes accumulate over thousands of years. We tend to think of natural selection—”survival of the fittest”—but sexual selection works the same way and can be just as strong in shaping how species look and act.

Filmed and photographed by Tim Laman.

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Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

19 thoughts on “Natural Selection & Sexual Selection: An Illustrated Introduction

  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    Thank you for making this, it is very helpful for my study

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  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    would you mind if i use parts of this video for non money educational purposes? in mexico. thanks, obiuosly i will mention you in th credits 🙂 good day and what a brilliant channel you have.

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  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    In case of the fancy males, a bit more elaborate explanation so as to "why" would be, that there may be two ways how the fancy traits are relevant for fitness. One option is, that if a male develops useless fancy traits and funny courtship behavior, and still has enough energy and enough capability to survive and escape from predators, that indirectly says, he´s got some very good genes other than those coding for the fancy traits. Another option is, that within the karyotyp, the fancy genes may bond with some high quality genes which are directly relevant for survival and fertility, and are carried onto the next generation together, so the fancy traits then serve as markers of the presence of those highly appreciated genes. Gene interactions that would only enable the development of fancy traits if high quality genes are present, are also possible. Whichever the case, not only males get selected. Females are also subjected to selection, regarding their mating choices. It is easy to see, how the males who can demonstrate their wholesome genetic qualities get preffered, and how females who prefer males who really have some hidden quality behind their fanciness, get also preferred.

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  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    Does this mean that a female 'fancy' is probable? if so would the males mate with her? because she is carrying the fancy genes?

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  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    @ 2:30
    NOOOO! GET IT IN! 🙁

    Sorry if that was too inappropriate… the illustration is quite humorous…

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  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    wait I don't understand. How can birds just get more elaborate because it works? Things don't just happen because we want them to. So how can good traits become better over time. O wait… mutation right?

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  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    Its selection. They dont have to 'know if it works'. The males with non useful traits and females that chose those mates get selected against. The males with useful traits and females that chose them get selected for. If a males has certain colors that mean they produce more of a vitamin, and another has a color that means he produces less of a vitamin, the females that have a tendency for the 'useless color' will be selected against, leaving only females that want the good color. I think.

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  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    The reason given for the burly and fancy traits not to be passed on to the female were not adequate. They cannot simply choose the traits that will or will not benefit them. In fact, in some species the male and female are virtually identical.

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  • October 5, 2017 at 4:48 pm
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    Great video. Why isn't this video open to everybody? I went here through a link on facebook.

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