Neutrinos: Nature’s Ghosts?



Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

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Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

47 thoughts on “Neutrinos: Nature’s Ghosts?

  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    Is there any study about use neutrinos in communication systems, since there is so little interference with the environment?

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    how do you make a beam if 5 light-years of lead doesn't stop them?

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    MMM. I am confused with this explanation: Are neutrino's actually real particles or just assumed to exist because energy is assumed not to be able to disappear? In the latter case, Pauli's 1930 neutrino might not actually exist but are conjured up as imaginary particles only added to balance energy equations, which are but mathematical assumptions. Is there any tangible proof for their physicality? Does a neutrino-detector detect their presence directly or do the detectors only detect an absence of energy? Measuring an absence is not proof of a presence of something. What is a beam of neutrino's? Do we use neutrino's or do we use proxy-particles for neutrino's… I would like to know.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    I think of neutrino's as the sawdust of beta decay.
    Kinda like sawdust in a furniture factory.
    Not part of the furniture and doesn't much get in the way but lots of it left on the floor for the janitor to sweep up every night.
    Is this an OK analogy?

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    If neutrinos have mass then they cannot travel at the speed of light, and hence one would expect their arrival from a nearby supernova to be somewhat later than photons that were emitted at roughly the same time.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    How did we come up with such a convenient neutrino detector suddenly to switch it on and off??

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    am I the only one who get itchy while thinking about neutrinos going true me?

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    Its really annoying that he keeps turning from one camera to the other.. this is a video on physics, not the oscars pre-show. Also a good thing to mention would of been the balloon over the ant-arctic using the ocean as a Neutrino detector. 

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    I can hear his lips sticking together. He needs to drink more water and speak up so that I'm not deafened at the end when the Fermilab name pops up. That, or better video editing.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    Thank you for this great video, it's safe to say this has helped me with my physics essay tonight. 

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    The story about neutrino is one of the exciting science fairy tale story like cinderella and snow white.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    my question is, if Neutrinos were so hard to detect then how did Neutrinos detector came into existence before Neutrinos were found??

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    Actually it's completely open knowledge. No secrecy at all. The gist is that neutrinos can't be directed, but their parent particles can. Shoot muons at a target and when they decay their neutrino decay particles are moving in the same direction. Nothing tricky. (OK, it's very tricky. But pretty easy for a pro.)

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    i've seen so many videos on youtube explainin neutrinos, however these videos are absolutely the best. extremely comprehensive and intuitive. thanks!

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    I just wanted to tell how good you are at explaining. Iam a regular IT engineer on deep water. But I am curies. And Fermlab Do help allot for me to understand =) The hardest thing left now that I did not at all get. Was how Einstein could calculate or figure out how spacetime was even there from the beginning. And how that might maybe work. Quantum Physics should be called Quantum Magic. =)

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    I have become entangled with this video! My wave function cannot collapse until the sequel is posted!

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    It's good that you are interested…. part two is shot and is being edited.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    great vid. The content described a physical phenomenon, how we detected this phenomenon, how we isolated it, and is going to follow-up with where the current state of the research it. The video from last week about a particle resonance did none of this. There should be criteria for posting your vids, and the ones I described above might be a start. Also, it is fine if you don't approve my comment. It is for the uploader, not the public. Please keep up the good work!

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    Very large detectors that watch for very small flashes of light for very long periods of time.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    They collide with the nucleus of an atom, causing decay which produces a flash of light.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    Neutrino detectors have large volumes of chlorine or gallium which are periodically checked for excesses of argon or germanium atoms which are created by neutrinos interacting with the original substance. So it just detect those interactions.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    Keep in mind that 5 light years of lead stops half of the neutrinos. Thus neutrinos interact a very small amount. This is true for the Earth, in which neutrinos interact a tiny bit. Even in a relatively small (i.e. building-sized) detector, a tiny fraction of neutrinos interact. These are what are observed in detectors.

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    If neutrinos do not interact with most forms of energy, how does a neutrino detector "see" neutrinos?

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  • September 15, 2017 at 9:30 pm
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    Great video ,good made , more videos like that 😉 Keep it going

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