Does Shaking Polaroid Pictures Actually Do Anything?



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Penthouse and Stephen King

In this video:

For anyone unfamiliar with the 2003 hip-hop hit, Hey Ya! by OutKast, the line “shake it like a Polaroid picture” is repeated over a dozen times. The accompanying music video released alongside the single saw the line punctuated by a bunch of attractive women shaking recently taken Polaroid photos, along with their various wobbly bits, with dangerous levels of enthusiasm.

Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2017/01/time-polaroid-issue-press-release-asking-people-not-shake-like-polaroid-picture/

Sources:

https://www.amazon.com/Instant-Story-Polaroid-Christopher-Bonanos/dp/1616890851/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1485342875&sr=8-1&keywords=instant+the+story+of+polaroid&linkCode=ll1&tag=vicastingcom-20&linkId=0fa5875e144c526a45a9302fd6bee15f
https://www.amazon.com/Camera-Does-Rest-Polaroid-Photography/dp/022617638X/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1485342914&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Camera+Does+the+Rest:+How+Polaroid+Changed+Photography&linkCode=ll1&tag=vicastingcom-20&linkId=d8c6dc3bcd5fc61854dda9bf12f1144c
http://www.foxnews.com/story/2004/02/18/dont-shake-it-like-polaroid-picture.html?refresh=true
http://archive.fortune.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2004/06/28/374369/index.htm
http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/ptech/02/17/polaroid.warns.reut/index.html
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/12/hey-ya-history_n_3682470.html
http://fortune.com/2012/10/05/polaroids-instant-karma/
http://old.seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2001869006_polaroid02.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_3000
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant_camera
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polaroid_Corporation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polaroid_SX-70
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_H._Land

http://savepackfilm.net/stories/the-story-of-packfilm
https://medium.com/vantage/9-reasons-to-love-packfilm-b3709aea0104#.nqpv9c9z6
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant_film#Polaroid
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant_film#Polaroid

Image Credit:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_Ya!#/media/File:OutkastHeyYa.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:OutKast_Andre_3000_Big_Boi_Performing_Shankbone_2014.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:0188_Polaroid_SX-70_Model_2_White_(5141856950).jpg
https://www.bigstockphoto.com/ru/image-177604468/stock-photo-low-angle-closeup-shot-of-two-business-partners-in-handshake%3A-unrecognizable-african-american-businessman-shaking-hands-with-caucasian-colleague-in-hall-of-modern-glass-office-building-at-night-time
https://www.bigstockphoto.com/ru/image-148837672/stock-photo-happy-man-using-a-vintage-camera
https://www.bigstockphoto.com/ru/image-29718326/stock-photo-%D0%91%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%BA%D1%80%D0%BE%D1%82%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B2%D0%BE
https://www.bigstockphoto.com/ru/image-180322690/stock-photo-las-vegas-jan-08-%3A-the-polaroid-booth-at-the-ces-show-held-in-las-vegas-on-january-08-2017-ces-is-the-world-s-leading-consumer-electronics-show

Music from Jukedeck – create your own at http://jukedeck.com.

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Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

48 thoughts on “Does Shaking Polaroid Pictures Actually Do Anything?

  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    Humans like being in control, shaking an object feels like doing something that helps.
    Humans are also good at drawing connections, even if there are non, so they see a causal link between a picture developing and shaking it, even if it is not true in any way.

    People like thinking what they do helps, so telling them to stop shaking'll be a challenge.. :p hihi

    Oh and yeah, they saw others do it, so copying like you in this video kinda explained. :p

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    My only problem with this channel is it goes way too much into back stories. We didn't really need to know the history of the OutKast song "Hey Ya!" or a brief history of the group Outkast. Or what the polaroid company said about the "Hey Ya!" video, or what person went to what party etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc etc……..

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    If you sling a USB drive hard enough, you can get more on it

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    They used to peel apart and then you wiped some pink bar of something over the surface but I don't know what that was.
    Everyone, please watch my little nature videos. There is no talking in them. Shhh!

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    The Polaroid brand is actually a husk of its former self in the modern day. They basically just market their name to any manufacturers that wish to use it for a price. This means you have the name recognition but not a consistent quality to expect. In the modern day, cameras that achieve the Polaroid effect are marketed as instant cameras and are widely used in markets ranging from ~50 dollar/37 pound examples for casual users to instant cameras that exceed 200 dollars/150 pounds being used by professionals interested in a more vintage looking image. However, the latter quality is not really found being made by the Polaroid brand but instead by Fujifilm or smaller startup equivalents. This resulted from the bankruptcy of the once popular brand mentioned in this video.

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I had the original Polaroid and after drying you had to take a small pink wiper soaked in some sore of solvent and wipe the picture to stabilize it,

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    It just reminds me of blowing into cartridges for games back then. People kinda did it, though not really roughly. I loved Polaroids.

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    0:14 "….. Should leave the fucking room, go listen to OutKast and come back bc what the fuck is you doin"

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    To safely speed up the development process in modern polaroid type films, (particularly in cold conditions) just put the photo in your armpit… no waving, no hits, runs or errors…

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I was told or was under the impression that shaking photo helped to distribute the developer fluid faster. I never thought it had anything to do with exposure to air.

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    At a wedding I was at just a couple weeks ago, the guests were encouraged to take polaroids of themselves with props and put them in the guest book.
    This question came up, and that was the first time I'd heard that it could actually be bad for the picture, though I've long thought waving it probably didn't do anything.

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I just had to pause your video at 00:34 to appreciate your commentary of the music video. I was dangerously enthusiastic of your wording.

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I have used all three generations of Poloroid film: ("peel apart" roll film ,"peel apart" pack film and self enclosed SX-70 types.) at NO time EVER was waving a Polaroid photo to "speed" (or help) develop a photo a recommended "thing", On SX-70 (and every later Polaroid camera) it was pointless, on the two earlier formats, it was likely WORSE as you are inviting dust!. I should expect however, that 2000's era folk not to understand 1950's-'70s technology. I had to explain to a "kid" that one doesn't keep their finger in the dial of a rotary phone through it's return travel
    , as that tends to fuck up the cadence of the pulse train of the digits. GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    When the picture comes out, it is warm, so it's natural to shake it to cool it down. Even with no mention of it, people would still do it.

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    As Simon and others have mentioned, it was only the old black and white Polaroid roll film that came out wet and had a separate squeegee wand to wipe across the print to seal it. As I recall, the film "roll" was actually two rolls–one with the film and the other with the developer. Once the picture was taken, a small tab (left over from the previous exposure) could be pulled to draw the exposed film and paper out of the camera. Rollers inside the camera popped the developer pouch and spread the developer over the film and print. The print had to rest for a minute to develop, then the positive print was peeled away from the sandwich of film and carrier (and still wet developer). The print was wet and wanted to curl, so you shook it to speed drying then curled it flat. After that you took the squeegee out of its tube (one squeegee came with each pack of film) and wiped it across the print and again, shook it to dry it quickly. It was like magic!

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    What about exposing the photos so sunlight while they are developing? I always put them in a dark spot immediately, does it help at all?

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I always thought shaking them was to encourage the chemicals into the image

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    In the past,people didn't "shake" a photo. It was gently waved about to help it dry. And YES it was damp. And YES it did help to dry the pictures. After a picture was taken,the photo came out with damp smelly photo chemicals on it. The picture was not very clear. As it dried,it became more clear. Many people if not most,were impatient and waved them around gently to dry them faster and YES INDEED it helped. Or you could let the picture dry on a counter-top but many impatient adults or small children would pick the pictures up and get their fingers on them destroying the picture-which is another good reason that these pix were waved about–to keep impatient fingers from mucking them up…

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    "Lay it down on a level and undisturbed surface, like a Polaroid picture! Heeeeeeeeeeeeyyyyyyyy Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!"

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    the best way to develop a polaroid is face down on a clean surface for at least a minute. it prevents any overexposure.

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    The new cameras produce an instant print and a digital file for digital shaking later. The print is 3×4 like usual so the digital file is quite a bit better. Prints from your phone too. File size is 10 ($100) or 20 megapixel ($200)

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I still shake "polaroid" pictures or instax films though well… cause habits die hard… I guess?

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  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    Older Polaroid cameras had a tube with a print coating that needed to be applied to the print within about an hour so that the print wouldn't fade. You passed the applicator over the print and then had to wait for it to dry. Some (most) impatient people would wave the print about in an attempt to speed up the drying process. That's where the shaking of the Polaroid print came from. Here's an image of thecapplucator: https://goo.gl/images/wpujCz

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    Well did anyone bring up Deadpool as a Polaroid reference?

    Great vids Simon keep it up!!

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    No wonder the company went down. As a designer, I cringe at the idea they tried to eliminate shaking the polaroid. That's like telling people not to blow bubbles with chewing gum and never developing bubblegum.

    People have a marketable, recognizable craving. To have something physical as an instant reward and shaking it while they wait. Shaking it is part of the experience.

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I was recently watching your video on a real world "Unobtanium" (February 24th, 2016) and it gave me an idea for a question: Is there (or could there be) a real world version of Rearden Metal from Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged?

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I got an instant camera last year and I love it. It really takes away the stress of trying to get that perfect shot I feel with digital, so I can go exploring and have fun taking quick pics on the fly.

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    Do all of your hand gestures actually do anything? Or maybe you just enjoy fidgeting?

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 11:58 am
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    I'm a 90's kids and Had my own Polaroid camera and shook hundreds of Polaroid pictures from 1990-1999, My parents still have their camera but the battery stop working and I wanted to buy a camera, and prints but I cant because the average price for a Polaroid prints is over $50

    Reply

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