Alfred, Lord Tennyson “The Charge of the Light Brigade”Wax Cylinder Poem animation



Heres a virtual movie of Alfred Lord Tennyson reading his much celebrated poem “The charge of the light brigade” The Charge of the Light Brigade” is an 1854 narrative poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson about the Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava during the Crimean War. He was the poet laureate of the United Kingdom at the time of the writing of the poem.

The sound track comes from a wax cylinder recording he made for an Edison Recording agent in 1890. This poem was recorded alongside several others on a set of twenty three soft wax cylinders most of which have perished eaten by mould.Wax cylinders were made from an organic material rather like hard soap. Although the age of this recording age and the primitive technology sometimes renders words inaudible, Tennyson’s voice comes through clearly, intoning the pounding dactylic rhythms of the verse which gives it a breathless momentum.Hearing Tennyson read his poems confirms to me that even late in life as he was and in poor health no one can read his poetry as effectively as he could,there is a mysterious knocking noise towards the end of the recording of which we can only speculate,it has been suggested that Tennyson may have made the noise in an attempt to create the sound of horses hoofs.,

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS (6 August 1809 — 6 October 1892) was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom during much of Queen Victoria’s reign and remains one of the most popular poets in the English language.
Kind Regards

Jim Clark
All rights are reserved on this video recording copyright Jim Clark 2011

The Charge of the Kight Brigade……..

Half a league, half a league,
Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
“Forward, the Light Brigade!
“Charge for the guns!” he said:
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

2.
“Forward, the Light Brigade!”
Was there a man dismay’d?
Not tho’ the soldier knew
Someone had blunder’d:
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die:
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

3.
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volley’d and thunder’d;
Storm’d at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of Hell
Rode the six hundred.

4.
Flash’d all their sabres bare,
Flash’d as they turn’d in air,
Sabring the gunners there,
Charging an army, while
All the world wonder’d:
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right thro’ the line they broke;
Cossack and Russian
Reel’d from the sabre stroke
Shatter’d and sunder’d.
Then they rode back, but not
Not the six hundred.

5.
Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volley’d and thunder’d;
Storm’d at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell,
They that had fought so well
Came thro’ the jaws of Death
Back from the mouth of Hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.

6.
When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wondered.
Honor the charge they made,
Honor the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred.

source

Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

23 thoughts on “Alfred, Lord Tennyson “The Charge of the Light Brigade”Wax Cylinder Poem animation

  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    My Awesome English teacher sent me to this interesting video! Added to my Educational videos list!! 😀

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    there is also a recording of a bugler who was part of the light brigade who plays the bugle from that battle. thank you for posting this video.

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    Glory to man for the internet, without which this moment would not have ever been possible …. re arthur C clarks 3rd law :
    "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic"

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    One of the greatest poems of all time in the voice of the man himself…..  goosebumps.

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    Technology! A 200 year old wax cylinder captures the poet, and a global communications network enables the world to hear it.

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    Interesting how England's foremost poet of Victorian times, who was made a Lord and took tea with Queen Victoria, retained a strong Lincolnshire accent to the end of his life.

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    Hard to believe we have a recording of someone who was born 200 years ago, much less Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    As poet laureate he would have been obliged to take a patriotic stance on the charge of the light brigade

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    Oh ye I get the deterioration, read your description, its a miracle theres a voice from 1890. Only once cud I just make out the words 600. I could here almost all of the other words and lines, struck me as odd those words + lines were 1s I repeatedly couldnt hear. Must be coincidence. Thought there may've been reason like they were spoke in hushed tones or like victorian morality meant to describe/mention fallen heros was a form of blasphemy (not that exactly but some reason along those lines).

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    When Tennyson wrote his poem it marked a moment of national disaster a 9/11 moment poet laureate it would have been a patriotic duty to mark the occasion with a poem. I am not an expert on Tennyson,but even though the poem is actualy very good,I don't suppose he would have regarded it anything like his best. I seem to remember reading that "Crossing The Bar" was his favourite. The missing words are caused by deterioration caused as I describe in the notes.

    Kind Regards
    Jim Clark

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    You can make out most of what is said, especially if you already know the words, but I never once heard the words 600, noble 600, valiant 600 everything else but the 600 bits. Is there a reason for this Just coincedence Or some meaning like those words were left out for a reason. Im asking you as you seem to know what your talking about. I read some where he wasnt so keen to write this but had to, and kind of gave it a certain critical tone, not of the 600 of course but something else. luv to no

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    Poems are always best read by their writers as they know what tense to use and where, they know what they meant, where the pause should be, where the whisper should be, where the slamming of the words should be. Every other reader is interpreting it all, even tho they can still be good we'll never know if that is what was meant. English language isnt just words. In fact words are almost the least important aspect of communication, its context and tone, none of which I can demonstrate in text.

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    This is absolutely incredible. Among the first ever recordings of the human voice. Gotta love the 'net.

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  • August 31, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    This is so cool! Saw this in my English Class (HENDERSHOT)!

    Reply

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