Blythe Baird – “Yet Another Rape Poem”



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37 thoughts on “Blythe Baird – “Yet Another Rape Poem”

  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    this poem gave me chills. all of her poems do. thank you for sharing and continuing to talk about it even when people misguidedly try to advise you otherwise.

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    When you click the thumbs up before you even watch the video because you already know how great all of her poems are

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    When I'm crying over everything that's happened to me I search for anything with Blythe's name on it💖

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    When I'm crying over everything that's happened to me I search for anything with Blythe's name on it💖

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    Her poems are amazing, I don't think there is a time I have listened to them and haven't cried tbh

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    i immediately liked the video when i clicked on it. when you see blythe baird, you know it's going to be good.

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    “Watch me build an empire from the ashes of everything that tried to destroy me”

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    “I’ve noticed that people only stop calling me victim and started calling me survivor when I stopped talking about it”

    THAT PART HAD ME IN SHAMBLES❗️

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    as if admitting you were raped wasn't the hardest thing in the world. another amazing work blythe. never, ever stop. love your words and your willingness to share.

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    I’ve never seen or heard your poems before, but this was absolutely beautiful. It was so strong and I applaud you. Thank you

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    “In response to the old dudes who made Youtube videos complaining I write to many poems about rape I know you think that I talk to much I know you don’t think this is what a pleasant survivor is suppose to sound like I know you are threatened because I am a thunder storm of a woman with so much to say do you know how long it took me to say anything at all? Sometimes I worry I write to much about assault I worry this is to heavy a burden to talk about I worry I’m putting to much responsibility on you the listener but when I talk about my trauma I’m not asking you to carry it or relieve me from it I’m just asking for it not to be to heavy for a conversation this experience takes up so much space inside of me and this stage is the only place I can let this trauma live outside of my body there is no socially acceptable time or place to talk about rape I am afraid to wear my recovery to publicly I have noticed that people only stop calling me victim and started calling me survivor when I stopped talking about it and I have stopped bringing flowers to the grave of the teenager I use to be back when I had orchids in my hair and polka dots on my shoes bubbling over with light I use to refuse to wear the dress I was assaulted in I use to imagine it draped in a sash of caution tape because it was the only witness I threw the underwear away I didn’t want to write a statement or file a report I wanted to take a shower I wanted to scream my statement is that I stayed here in this body but everyday I find new ways to heal I wear the dress I was assaulted in and I don’t associate it with him just to remind myself he does not own a single fucking part of me I found a way to heal through the poetry this stage is the only place I could tell my story were it wasn’t a burden I wasn’t putting on to anyone this stage is were I learned to stop hoarding my suffering and I could give a fuck about a slam score this is me healing this is me reclaiming ownership of my body this is the only place I have control over the narrative and he can not interrupt me even though trauma has a way of becoming the wallpaper of my head watch me drag the art from my suffering watch me plant seeds down my spine and bloom into a garden of poetry from every horrible thing that ever happen to me every night my voice turned into cement and I couldn’t say anything watch me build an empire from the ashes of every single thing that ever tried to destroy me.”

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    Yes, honey. Speak about the things that people say make them uncomfortable. Speak about the things that there will never be a good time and place for. Because once you start speaking, then they have to hear it, and that makes us all one step closer to getting used to hearing it. And the next time they hear it, they are not so surprised. That's how you change people.

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  • November 7, 2017 at 8:28 am
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    “I’m afraid to wear my recovery too publicly. I’ve noticed that people only stop calling me victim and started calling me survivor when I stopped talking about it. And I’ve stopped bringing flowers to the grave of the teenager I use to be; back when I had orchids in my hair, and polka dots on my shoes, bubbling over with light.”

    Reply

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