How to Read Poetry



Reading and interpreting poetry is often a frustrating event for students. Try this method, though! Read it once for an overview. Read it again, annotating the literary devices you notice. Finally, read it one more time, taking the time to put all the puzzle pieces together and form an interpretation. While this method won’t solve all of your challenges, it may allow you to slow down, practice, and form stronger interpretations of difficult poetry!

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Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

27 thoughts on “How to Read Poetry

  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    At my school, my year have started to practise/revise for out GCSE's and I find poetry hard this really helped

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  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    This helps a lot. I have a smart professor, but I sometimes need that extra something and this was it. Thanks!

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  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    Poetry was never one of my strong points, but I believe that this podcast and your teaching method(s) will definitely help me.

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  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    As an educator I truly enjoyed your strategies to approaching poetry. I teach 5th grade and I want my students to learn to love it!

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  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    Those numbers of reads???

    …but there is only one number of reads. Tsk! Americans; 'can't speak English properly.

    The kids may speak how they like but the teacher must be correct. Otherwise, they can blame the teacher.

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  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    3:00 Three-read system
    first read: general impression, happy? sad? nature? love?
    second read: identify similes, metaphors, allusions, puns, rhyme
    third read: find deeper meanings, connect the dots

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  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    Thank you so much for putting up this video, I've always admired the artform but my GCSE English Poetry exam is in 4 days and this is bringing my confidence right up.

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  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    thank you. ive been watching a few of your videos and they are really well done. helped me a lot.

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  • November 5, 2017 at 7:51 pm
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    i hate poetry, it has no use at all, p for poem, p for private, they dont say what they mean because the meaning is private to the individual, otherwise it would not be encoded in silly language use. if poems are so hard to understand why  try to understand them, interpret them as you want, poetry is dead, it killed itself, for the simple reason of its inaccesability, if a poems message is not understood at first read, then the poet failed, how are we to know if word and sentence arrangement is preplanned, thats not the case, the poem itself dictates its own structure, no need to discect it into little pieces, when one does this it defeats the whole concept.
    why cant authors , write a second version in clear language, and we can see how deviant the critics understanding of the poem is ….

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