My Boy Jack – End Poem



Writer Rudyard Kipling (David Haig) recites the poem he wrote for his son Jack (Daniel Radcliffe) after he was killed in war.

“Have you news of my boy Jack?
Not this tide.
When dyou think that hell come back?
Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.

Has any one else had word of him?
Not this tide.
For what is sunk will hardly swim,
Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.

Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?
None this tide,
Nor any tide,
Except he did not shame his kind —
Not even with that wind blowing, and that tide.

Then hold your head up all the more,
This tide,
And every tide;
Because he was the son you bore,
And gave to that wind blowing and that tide!”

-My Boy Jack by Rudyard Kipling

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38 thoughts on “My Boy Jack – End Poem

  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    My mom got very sad at the end of the speech, at that time, I was getting better from severe depression, my mom very sadly, "please don't kill yourself."

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    I don't know why I keep watching this clip as it breaks my heart and makes me cry every time I do .

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    I don't think any person whether they are male or female, have children or not can sit through this video without a painful feeling in their chest, tears in their eyes and a sorrow than is incomprehensible

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    Kipling's search for his son led him, among other huge efforts, to work with the War Graves Commission. The beautiful inscription used on graves of unknown soldiers "Known unto God" was suggested by him.

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    My father's eldest brother died at the battle of Loos, 16 years of age.
    https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-maxwell-reid/to-the-full-extent-of-their-power/10153332753293326?pnref=story
    "On September 25 1915, you were killed on the first day of the Battle of Loos, (pronounced loss), North East France. The quiet village of Loos, surrounded by coal slag heaps, woods and farmland would go into history. In a single day, the British, suffered the largest single loss of life recorded since the beginning of the war. The Scots (“Jocks”), took the brunt of it. You, and three quarters of the 8,500 British troops that died that day, have no known burial."

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    Would have been a nice touch to have the real Jack Kipling's photo on the mantelpiece

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    Twenty-nine years ago, my own son was killed — not in war, but by a hit-and-run drunk driver.  My son was nearly 21;  I was 50. Now, at 80, I know I still need to cry every now and then to uncork the bottle of tears within me.  This beautiful, agonizing story, so brilliantly played, has opened that bottle and let me cry again — for my son, for Kipling's son, for the loss by millions of parents everywhere, of their children.  David Haig's performance throughout — especially with this poem — is heart-wrenching.

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    A British educated, American trained Trauma Surgeon, I served in Afghanistan from the beginning until recently. Today I was cleaning up old uniforms, books, etc. and discovered I had carried Kipling's poem the whole time. Fantastically sad and so true to the feeling. Reading it again, I am not ashamed to say that I found myself weeping for the first time in many years.

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    "Oh dear, what comfort can I find?"
    "Not this tide, or any tide."
    …Gets me every time I hear it. Such pain in those words.

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    Kipling spent his remaining years searching for his son. He even went as far as to have leaflets dropped from a plane over the German trenches. He never found his son and never gave up looking for him.

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    MAKES ME THINK OF ALL THE MY BOY JACKS THAT NEVER CAME BACK AND BLESS THEM ALL

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    Just think of the pain & stupidity of War.
    Nevertheless what wonderful generations – those who fought for this country in the first & Second World Wars – so much pain & suffering yet they got on with it. Such honour & integrity. Today we are also let down by the rich & powerful but many have been sucked into their way of thinking – individual greed, self serving, no shame, no standards in morals etc.

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    @notablegoat Same here. I've got chills running up and down my spine and tears in my eyes…

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    I've never seen this movie, but even without much context, this is…so…sad…

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    i picked this film up at the local video store, I was looking for something to watch. I was absolutely amazed by this film. it is truley a great piece.

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  • August 26, 2017 at 10:03 pm
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    Excellent acting by David Haig, I am going watch thismovie again.

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