Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) | Q&A



Mouen Khashab, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of Therapeutic Endoscopy, Johns Hopkins Gastroenterology & Hepatology, discusses Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) – how it is performed, who is eligible for the procedure, expected outcomes and the key benefits.

For more information, visit the Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology webpage at http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/gastroenterology_hepatology/clinical_services/advanced_endoscopy/peroral_endoscopic_myotomy.html
Or call 443-287-1960.

Questions answered:
1. What is POEM? (0:11)
2. What is Esophageal Achalasia? (0:30)
3. Who does this condition effect and what symptoms are common? (1:20)
4. How is POEM performed? (1:46)
5. Who is eligible for the procedure? (3:12)
6. What are the expected outcomes? (3:36)
7. What are the key benefits of POEM? (3:54)

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8 thoughts on “Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) | Q&A

  • August 29, 2017 at 6:17 pm
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    There seems to be a big debate between the LHM and wrap and POEM due to reflux. What are the percentages for the reflux for each?

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  • August 29, 2017 at 6:17 pm
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    how well does this work for diffuse esophageal spasms, and how long will this procedure last once performed.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 6:17 pm
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    I had the POEM procedure performed in July, 2013 by Dr. Rivas at Stanford.  I was laid up for a few days but rebounded pretty quickly.  Once normal foods were allowed, I noticed a huge improvement.  For context, if my swallowing was at 20% of normal, the procedure increased it to 80%.  Unfortunately, these results lasted only briefly and I noticed the symptoms coming back in October, 2013.  Currently, I estimate my swallowing capacity at approximately 30% of normal and I am returning to Stanford to address what appear to be motility issues higher in the esophagus.  I am unable to determine whether the returned symptoms are the result of the POEM procedure losing its effectiveness or whether they are the result of other Achalasia symptoms.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 6:17 pm
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    At least two years durable" this sentence also stuck me. Can you please explain ?

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  • August 29, 2017 at 6:17 pm
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    At 4:22 he says "At least two years durable" What does this mean? The comment is very vague. Does it mean the effect of the procedure lasts only two years? Then you need it again? The lasting effect of the procedure is very poorly explained in this video.

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