Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

29 thoughts on “Rachmaninov: The Isle of the Dead, Symphonic poem Op. 29 – Andrew Davis

  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    I have seen the original island…..its situated in the country of Montenegro its there for real and you can even visit it !!!!!!!

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    Une de mes musiques favorites. L’île des morts de Rachmaninov et le Parsifal de Wagner constituent, de mon point de vue, l'ultime summum de l'art musical. Brillant !!!

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    + Caleb N +Johan Delvare Already knowing that Rachmaninov was an exceptionally strong pianist, but never ever having had the time to even read about the background of his work, I ended up stunned when hearing this for the first time (I know Ravel and now also Debussy a little while having an idea about Liszt 1848 symphonic poem Les Preludes that happens to be on a CD together with Sibelius. The Isle of the dead explains where Sibelius got some of his incomprehensibly good ideas from (i.e Rachmaninov). Time to see what I can find on the world wide web. Wikipedia reports that years after written this piece he stated that he never would have written it if he would have known what the paintings looks like for real, because that turned out to be a disappointment after first having seen a black and white of it in Paris. If you want to know you can find the photo he saw easily and conclude for yourself that it is only logical that its mystery inspired Rachmaninov to write this. And what to do if you do not wnat to know, because you feel that music is about feelings only and thus not about knowledge? Listen another carefully and look for the difference between the image and the music, then look up the black white photo and notice that he indeed managed to touch what is special about the photo! Listen again but then thinking from the photo.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    a blue black silhouette of Salisbury Sanskrit subsisting on shadows and shadows.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    Nah, looks like the ruins of Necromanteion on the river Acheron..

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    Another crim. No, not you! Him! "Sir" Andrew Davis. Oh, he's a conductor. No he's not. Guess why? Because of her. Not not her. "Her Majesty!" She's a fraud. Along with him.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    I cannot tell you what this piece does to me. The commitment from the composer is total. One immediately senses he has poured his heart into it without restraint. He has abandoned himself to the contemplation of the fate that awaits us all. He must have conducted his first performance of this in tears.

    The passage begins. Charon plunges his oars into the river and the boat creaks into motion. Uselessly, our passenger casts forlorn glances at the receding shore of departure — they count for nothing. Charon's rhythm is steady, unflinching.

    The bitterness of fond remembrance of life's most cherished moments, which serve now only to torment, to evoke unutterable anguish, begin to crush Charon's charge. The nostalgia is so powerful, but there is no going back. For some time our passenger is able to lose himself in ecstasy, as the recollections of a long and happy life caress him.

    After a while, however, the lapping of the water impinges on his revelry, dragging him back to the immediacy of his surroundings.

    Finally, our passenger yields, and turns slowly towards to his looming place of arrival. The towering darkness of the Isle of the Dead awaits.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    This is such an exquisite tone poem. But I could imagine that it could be used straight into any number of scifi/ action films. But that would be terrible since it is an exquisite piece by itself.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    This reminds me of the score from "Journey to the Center of the Earth". Not the Brendan Fraser one, the good one.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    one of the most powerful pieces i can pick at present, my mother just passed on, i didn't even intend to lay this i had Scheherazade on then this came up, i cant turn it off, as an animator i now have to illustrate this piece as a project.

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  • August 29, 2017 at 3:15 pm
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    Sounds very like The Lord of the Rings soundtrack! :O Maybe this gorgeous song was an inspiration

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