Shakespeare’s Favorite Poems



Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Poetry is at the heart of music in a lot of ways, from obvious connections like lyrics to deeper points like their shared love of rhythms, so I thought we could take a look at Shakespeare’s favorite kind of poem, the Sonnet! Writing a good sonnet takes a deep understanding of language, meter, and rhyme, and understanding how they work won’t just make us better poets, it’ll make us better musicians too!

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Last: https://youtu.be/j5WIUbZnNDE
Poetic Meter video: https://youtu.be/JMxzLOSlhbs
Rhymes video: https://youtu.be/ToOqsk8m220

SOURCES:
http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm
http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sonnets/18detail.html

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Also, thanks to Jareth Arnold and Inés Dawson for proofreading the script to make sure this all makes sense hopefully!

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Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

30 thoughts on “Shakespeare’s Favorite Poems

  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Dude, great video. Do you also write songs with lyrics?
    I would love some more videos about poetry, song lyrics and how they relate. Maybe you should consider starting a new series or second channel about that?

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    in spanish we've a form of poetry called Decima wich is basically: ABBAACCDDC

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Make a poem with 13 syllables per line with the 1st, 4th, 6th, and 12th syllables accented (3+2+6+2)

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Great video. I'd love to see more like this! I find the connection between meter and rhythm very interesting and would love to learn more. Thanks!

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Are you at all familiar with Leonard Bernstein's lectures at Harvard from 1973? In them he discusses the relationship between poetry and music extensively. I think you might enjoy it, although you should be prepared to devote A LOT of time to watching/listening.

    By the way yesterday was Lenny's birthday.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    As a theatre major, I applaud your knowledge of Shakespearean pronunciation. Good shit.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Were you trying to draw the Mandelbrot set at 3:27…? That just made me so happy. Thanks for this great video.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    How would you go about turning the words of a sonnet into the lyrics of a functional song? Is there a 1:1 meter exchange between poetry and music or is it less defined and leaves more room for interpretation?

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    A lovely and informative video as always! Really clear about the sonnet structure. However, I feel like it generalises a bit much about meter and rhyme, given that most poetry in the last 100 years hasn't used those much. Rhythm and sound are still vital, but in most modern poetry the rhythm is more like a free jazz solo or Stravinsky than a marching band of iambs and trochees. Given the way that 12 tone goes well beyond traditional functional theory, I'd like to think that this is just the start of a series that looks at how poetry brings out the musicality of language in the broadest sense 🙂

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Great video! I'd like to note that ordinary language is metrical as well. Poetry uses the metricality already in language to build pretty objects/rhythms… sort of like building cathedrals out of Lego! 😀 (bad metaphor?)

    Modern phonologists (since the late 80s / early 90s) actually use feet and other metrical/prosodic categories (such as moras, which are important to haiku) in their analysis of languages' sound systems. Metrical structure is quite core to the phonologies of the world's languages (in fact, even sign languages have metrical structure (and poetry) that is very similar to that of spoken languages).

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Could you, way off-topic, parody this video by overdubbing a funny narrative about your drawings. silly me.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    As usual, an excellent video. Though now my mind is flooded with potential first musical lines to set Sonnet 18 to music. I'm sure it's been done already, but I'm always on the lookout for favourite "lyrics" as I'd love to write something – almost anything! – to make it sound even more lyrical. Thank you!

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Great video! Great to hear about things like music (poetry in this case) to help strengthen or inspire music in the musician.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Fuck-ups in meter is why most of my lyrics end in the shitter.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    There's also the German sonnet, which is similar to the Petrarchan sonnet, except the octave is split into two quatrains and the sestet is split into two triplets.

    There's also the French sonnet, which has pretty much the same rhyme scheme as the German sonnet, but the French count syllables instead of feet (because their language doesn't really have stressed syllables), so each line is 12 syllables long, usually in two groups of six.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Dude, I want to hear you sing. I'm putting together the Youtube Super Group. You'll sing. Samurai Guitarist on guitar. Adam Neeley on bass. Moot Booxlé on keys. Still looking for a drummer though. You said you used to sing metal so come on man, sing!

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    There is also such thing as "Crown of sonnets". It's 14 sonnets linked together so that last line of a previous sonnet is a first line of a next one. And the last line of last sonnet is a first line of a first sonnet. And there is 15'th sonnet made up of this repeated lines! "Corona astralis" by Maximilian Voloshin is an example of stunning beauty and complexity of such poetic form.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Great video! You managed to make poetry actually interesting.

    But we better see more music videos 😉

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Good video that shows that to improve your music, you also must look at other arts. Not just listen to a lot of music and hope that you will improve (though it is a good methode), but also see how other arts are structured and how you can you can apply that structure to music.

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  • September 2, 2017 at 2:12 am
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    Thank you for recapping 11th grade English. Didn't care about it back then, but it's pretty rad now that I give a damned about things.

    Reply

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