A Short Guide to a Happy Life: Anna Quindlen Books, Quotes, Novels, Biography, Essays



Anna Marie Quindlen (born July 8, 1952) is an American author, journalist, and opinion columnist.

Her New York Times column, Public and Private, won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1992. She began her journalism career in 1974 as a reporter for the New York Post. Between 1977 and 1994 she held several posts at The New York Times. Her semi-autobiographical novel One True Thing (1994) was made into a film in 1998, starring Meryl Streep and Renée Zellweger.

Anna Quindlen was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 8, 1952, the daughter of Prudence (née Pantano, 1928–1972) and Robert Quindlen.[2][3][4] Her father was Irish American and her mother was Italian American. Quindlen graduated in 1970 from South Brunswick High School in South Brunswick, New Jersey[5] and then attended Barnard College from which she graduated in 1974. She is married to prominent New Jersey attorney Gerald Krovatin whom she met while in college. Their sons Quindlen Krovatin and Christopher Krovatin are both published authors, and daughter Maria is an actress, comedian and writer.[6][7][8]

Anna Quindlen left journalism in 1995 to become a full-time novelist.

In 1999, she joined Newsweek, writing a bi-weekly column until announcing her semi-retirement in the May 18, 2009 issue of the magazine. Quindlen is known as a critic of what she perceives to be the fast-paced and increasingly materialistic nature of modern American life. Much of her personal writing centers on her mother who died at the age of 40 from ovarian cancer, when Quindlen was 19 years old.

She has written five novels, two of which have been made into movies. One True Thing was made into a feature film in 1998 for which Meryl Streep received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Black and Blue and Blessings were made into television movies in 1999 and 2003 respectively.

Quindlen participates in LearnedLeague under the name “QuindlenA”.

In 1994, her semi-autobiographical novel was published, titled One True Thing. The book focuses on the relationship between a young woman and her mother who is dying from cancer. In real life, Quindlen’s mother, Prudence Quindlen, died in 1972 while in her 40s from ovarian cancer. At the time Quindlen was a college student, but would come home to take care of her mother.[10] In 1998, a film of the same name was released. The movie starred Meryl Streep and Renée Zellweger as “Kate and Ellen Gulden”, fictional versions of Prudence and Anna Quindlen. Streep was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Quindlen

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3 thoughts on “A Short Guide to a Happy Life: Anna Quindlen Books, Quotes, Novels, Biography, Essays

  • April 21, 2018 at 5:10 am
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    Please take a second to see my short film "UNARMED". This short film is about the effects POLICE BRUTALITY can have on a family. I poured my heart & soul into this film and you would literally make my DREAMS COME TRUE by watching and giving feedback. I am a student filmmaker and I literally went broke to produce this film! All feedback is wanted, Thanks!!!

    Reply
  • April 21, 2018 at 5:10 am
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    Clueless celebutards are not role models.
    This witch is not happy, an she wants company……

    Reply
  • April 21, 2018 at 5:10 am
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    This idiot diminishing men's challenge in the face of financial objectification needs to sit down and have a think about her privilege. Young men commit suicide far more than young women and live shorter lives. I am unmoved by her pathetic expectation that I as a man will automatically respect and listen to her whining just because she's a woman.

    Reply

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