Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

40 thoughts on “Learning Styles Don’t Exist

  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Learning Styles author, David Kolb NEVER indicated that a student should be taught in ONLY one style, but rather…begin with their preferred learning style and then MOVE THEM THROUGH each (different) style for deep long-term learning across multiple domains. The debate on Learning Styles is most often a result of not having read the original work of David Kolb.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I would change his final statement to "Good teaching is good teaching, and good teachers are CONSTANTLY adjusting their teaching to meet the needs of ALL the learners in the classroom, whatever their "learning styles" may be."

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I don't buy this. Why shouldn't a student with a great visual memory be fed information in a manner that LINKS the meaning to a visual image? I agree that it's a theory that confirmation bias plays heavily into, but I don't see this argument that the venue or form of information doesn't matter. The stimulus that is LINKED with the meaning matters a lot.

    We all know the feeling of sitting in an exam scrunching our face to try visualise what the last sentence was on the slideshow from your lecture 2 weeks ago, perhaps if you had a superior auditory memory and received this information verbally, you would have remembered it.

    Basically what I am saying is that saying we learn meanings rather than auditory/visual/kinesthetic information is wrong because recall works, especially in the early phases of learning, by referencing the information in the form it was given which is linked to the meaning. E.g. visually recalling that the sentence on the slideshow said "The mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell" leads you straight into the meaning of that sentence, and likewise if it was given in an auditory form. Therefore, the form matters because ability to recall information of different forms matters.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    This is an interesting argument, but I think there is a key concept missing – possibly not one which is seen as a central in the learning styles theory. As a Learning and Development trainer working with adults and with experience in Further Education, I see learning styles as more of a teaching method to appeal to student preferences, so they are more engaged and stimulated, so learn the concepts better. I always describe myself as a kinaesthetic (possibly with a sprinkling of ADD) – put me into a lenghty lecture or explanation, and I will get very restless and disengage totally, so will not learn much. Give me some tasks to do, and I will be fully engaged and motivated.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I always thought I was a visual learner because when I heard something–like a professor giving a lecture–I would write it down, and then read it. When I read it–took the information in visually–was when I really felt that the knowledge "clicked" and I completely understood what was being taught. Now I realize that reading the information was the third time that I was exposed to it (after hearing it and writing it down), so that's why things became clear after I read them.

    Thank you for this video, Professor Willingham.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    @Daniel Willingham – I sincerely have a difficult time with hearing & understanding what you are trying to explain. I was hoping that you can put website/article links in the video description for this video. Please? Thank you.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Incredibly interesting stuff, thanks for putting this online!

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Quote: "Good Teaching is Good teaching regardless of the learning style" Then the conclusion is there are a lot of bad teachers out there. This video offered no meaningful information to the argument… it's just noise

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Wouldn't that technically mean that learning styles exist just not in the standard way we think of them? It's a much more complicated process where a student uses any of the three means of taking in information and applies it to the most relevant data (Like the shape of Chad example).

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I certainly disagree with his inclusion of "always" in the context of what the theory predicts. For the theory to be valid it needs to only highlight a statistically different distribution of learning effectiveness based off sensory modality, and not an absolute difference.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Is Teaching an art or a science? Of course it's an art. Brain Gym was lies and Learning Styles being quantified ? Science works and stand thorough scrutiny!

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Love the comments below: as usual in America, everyone considers him- or herself an expert on education because everyone has been to school. That's like saying I'm a doctor because I go to the clinic when I'm sick. Nonetheless, more pub ed administrators need to do their own homework on all of these theories before embracing – and demanding that their faculties – embrace every new (so-called) "strategy" that emerges (usually the brainchild of nomadic "consultants" who will tell you in private – sometimes on stage – that they came up with a gimmick and got out of the classroom as soon as they could!). But as long as "edu-crats," ignorant and self-important trustees, politicians, and parents who refuse to believe it's THEIR kid who is the slowest one in the class delude themselves into believing that yet another magic trick will cheat Nature's ability bell curve (it exists for a reason), we'll continue to spend countless billions on short-lived "programs,' "at-risk strategies," discredited but oh-so-profitable high-stakes testing and the constant diversion of valuable resources to classroom bottom-feeders who aspire to careers as gamers, rappers, pro sports first-round draft picks (or, lately, "agents"), network talent show champions, physicians (but have difficulty spelling "doctor"), or future stars of "16 and Pregnant."

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    If you follow the closed captions they are not the same as the spoken words. Interesting!

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I'll rather characterize the teaching to be "good teaching" that the individual student would find effective to their learning. The video clearly doesn't refute "learning styles don't exist" but rather argues that it is immaterial as per how information is perceived by brain. It seems that effective teaching still has to consider individual ability that is quintessential for perceiving the information being taught effectively.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Not learning style as much as getting the material taught in a way to make it interesting so people are engaged in it.

    Do I prefer to sit on my hands and listen to a person talk about how to do something or do I like getting my hands on it and 'actively participating' in the lesson as we are going through it? … Sorry my being bored and not wanting to listen for several hours doing nothing doesn't mean I cannot learn something it just means the person presenting the material needs to get the audience to actively be involved as they go – not to mention the importance of pausing /shutting off the fire-hose of knowledge so people don't drown … again that is not a learning style … but a simple fact some people really are terrible at explaining things and if they never stop to ensure the concept is soaking in to the audience there will just be people who are better at recalling things better because their ability to focus was better than others….

    Lets just accept it people don't learn different ways, they simply are able to focus better than others…

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    "Good teaching is good teaching and good teachers don't need to adjust their teaching to individual students learning styles." Good teachers do adjust to their student's interests, abilities and stage of development.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    He makes good points, but they're mostly about how people MISINTERPRET the theory, and that doesn't justify a misleading headline that "Learning Styles Don't Exist".  They DO exist, and he even says it.  It's just that the preference for one mode of learning over another is not as extreme (nor as different from individual to individual) as some would have you believe.  Everyone learns in all modes, and everyone learns better when information is presented in multiple different ways instead of just one way. 

    I worry that people will see the misleading headline and take things to the other extreme now, and say that there's only one learning environment or teaching style which is optimal for every student.  We need to encourage teachers that it's worth it to make the extra effort to present information in varied ways.  Just teach in varied ways to the whole group, instead of one way to this subgroup, and another way to that subgroup.  I worry that this article might cause some teachers to over-relax and stick to a single teaching style which is safe and comfortable.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I have no idea how my feed was hijacked but I have no problem with Daniels views
    Academics have no problem reversing positions  .  Our views are far more pragmatic based on clinically proven ideas about how best to internalize information and that is visually . While  a wide spectrum of aptitudes exists better is better  .Good teaching is only good teaching if it is for the benefit of everyone and not just the speaker .Daniels views are based on poor implementation not a flawed construct .

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    If you watch the video, he basically doesn't say "learning styles don't exist", but rather they don't matter for the type of material (meaning) that teachers teach in the classroom. Then makes some strawman arguments like people say certain types of learners must learn all information in that way alone. Of course some information is better presented in certain forms. This is just painfully obvious. Summary, this video is of little value, learning styles do exist, but he argues (very subjectively and without any solid basis) that they aren't of high importance in the classroom.
    This title is misleading, hyperbole, and basically clickbait.
    Move along..

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    OK, Cheryl, how would you learn how to correctly pronounce the Spanish phrase 'Hasta mañana', VISUALLY? How could your teacher, without speaking or using any audio at all, teach you this using only visual methods? Remember, the aim of the lesson is that all the students in the class will be able to pronounce this phrase correctly.

    All the research has shown that learning styles don't exist. Here I am referring to proper research, not just personal anecdotes. Watch the video again. Dan is right. He even explains why you THINK the theory is true.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I was searching for this research all day long, after discussing with my friends about this issue or what they called a myth

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    This does really take down the belief of learning styles, but the last bit made it sound like teachers dont need to do anything for the student and that is wrong. Teachers should help the student learn the material, and possibly alter the speed of teaching due to if there are students with processing issues :/

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I understand what he's saying… It's just that personally I can't learn auditorily hardly at all. I get migraines, and in high school my mom took me to a doctor who ran a whole bunch of tests (trying to figure out why) and in the process discovered that it takes auditory signals significantly longer to reach my brain than in most people. And to add to that in most of my childhood I ignored teachers and other kids and read and read and read. I read while walking in the hallway, during class, at dinner, in my free time, on the toilet, while visiting family states away that I wouldn't see again for another year, if I was awake I was reading. And so I read very, very, very fast and even with great retention. This ends with me sucking at learning from lectures and with me learning extremely quickly with reading. So, yeah, I guess most people don't learn very differently with different teaching styles. But it would be nice if I hadn't had to drop out of university because a lot of my professors made a significant portion of their tests from lecture material- in other words, material that I was bound to fail, despite that I had the textbook memorized. I guess that's a different subject though, since that's more of a learning disability than a preference for learning from reading over auditory.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Great presentation. In General, when students do not learn it is because they are taught not to. They are taught to shut up, listen, and behave. Besides, what is there to learn. We have a service economy: you show up to a job that a friend recommended you for, look good, wear a positive attitude, and have everybody like you. What more could you ask for.

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I'm sorry I really disagree with this video! Learning styles do exist. I myself have a learning disability and I do learn best visually

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    How do students construct meaning? Words and pictures are symbols for things that students will interact with. How does a piece of writing lead to action and change? It's translation of the symbols into personal meaning that a person then uses to interact with the world. Aristotle would probably argue that the whole point of learning (creating meaning though symbols – visual, audio, or otherwise) would be to increase the effectiveness of this eventually Kinesthetic [email protected]

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    I have talk German and Spanish for 17 years and am interested in what your theory about Learning Styles being a popular myth in the pedagogic world.  Second-Language Acquisition is a good platform to test your theory.  Good teachers employ all three "learning styles" anyway.  So called "Super smart" students, I have found, can learn German or Spanish with only one type of presentation, but those lacking certain intellectual skills need lots more help, and all three help it finally "click and stick".  Furthermore, to speed up the learning process, I have found even "super smart" students benefit from all three types of styles and presentations so that they learn huge amounts of vocabulary in a little amount of time, and are then able to be fluent very quickly.  

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Your argument is weak. If the problem is school work is meaning-based, then in situations where you can accommodate various strengths, which you admit exist, then you should do so. 

    Reply
  • September 11, 2017 at 12:52 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for your informative video. 
    I have taught for over 15 years and can tell you from experience that learning, to me, is all about input and output. What I mean is that things are inputed into a child's memory, and you hope that they are able to deliver some sort of output that shows that the input was, indeed, received. 

    That said, making learning engaging and fun is the motivating factor that enables students to retrieve (or input) information. To do this, some students have a preference for visual, auditory or hands-on. We know that motivation impacts learning. And relevance, incentives, and all that stuff is what motivates kids to want to take in information and, you hope that they are able to "prove" that they have, in fact, learned. Even a so called, auditory learner, could not be subjected to someone blabbing in their ear, and then be expected to remember a large portion of the material. Same would hold true for teaching a kid the shape of Florida by having him draw the shape and dance around on it so that he would remember the shape and then be able to match it later. I do want to add that no one is entirely a visual learner or auditory; it's always some sort of combined preference. I would say a percentage that obviously is entirely subjective and not quantifiable. 

    All of this considered, I think to say Learning Styles don't exist is not entirely accurate. Perhaps the term is sort of a misnomer. Maybe the term we should be using is Learning Preference. We all likely agree that learning is about engagement and motivation. We really only learn through three of our five senses (though smell could be debatable; I know that I have "learned" at the conceptual level what fried chicken or birthday cake smells like; yet, that's not part of the Common Core, so… 😉
    Thanks for the post. I'm hoping you could respond either in text or video. Would love to hear your thoughts. 

    One a related note, I taught at an all boys school for five years and can tell you that the way boys learn (in general) is quite different than girls. They "prefer" hands on, visual presentation of material. Girls, in my experience, enjoy more verbal (dialogue based) learning. Again, this is a huge generalization, but the success of same sex education and the research in relation to that topic supports this assertion. 

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *