Schnittke – Suite in the Old Style for Violin & Piano (Op.80)



Pastorale 0:00, Ballet 3:22, Minuet 5:36
Fugue 9:18, Pantomime 11:45
Vn. Irina Tseitlin, Pf. Patrick Dheur
This video is for educational purposes only.
Fair Use Act Disclaimer
© COPYRIGHT Disclaimer, Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976. Allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

source

Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

23 thoughts on “Schnittke – Suite in the Old Style for Violin & Piano (Op.80)

  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    The theme to the 2nd movement appears in his Symphony no 1, cool find (it's about 20 minutes in on the symphony)

    Reply
  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    The ballet and the fugue strongly reminds me of J. S. Bach or Handel.

    Reply
  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    I became curious about Schnittke by hearing the fugue on the radio this morning. I waited for the name and title, staying in the car just having arrived at work. I'm deeply impressed, he really touched my heart and soul. Delightful, spirited, elegant. I must confess that I never heard of him before – maybe it's an excuse to say I'm originally a jazz fan, but I love every kind of good music, an this here is extraordinary.

    Reply
  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    Anyone coming to this delightful piece for the first time really should look at other pieces by this much neglected Russian genius. His music is polystylistic – he can write something as (seemingly) simple as this but also music of great complexity. Later in life, and after a debilitating stroke, he became a Christian and wrote some of the most powerful church music you'll ever hear. Please, let's start a crusade to make Schnittke's music better known. There's no doubt he deserves it…

    Reply
  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    I cry every time I listen to the pastorale…it is so beutiful…

    Reply
  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    I see a similar development like in Stravinskys "Suite Italienne". Just the dissonance from the violin at the end, what a statement!

    Reply
  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    The theme from the minuet at 5:36 was further elaborated in Schnittke's "Musica nostalgica", for cello and piano.

    Reply
  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    That suite is one of the most complicated musical creations ever. And one of the most deceptive. Sorcerer88, its not about idiom and practice. Schnittke knew the rules these old masters used. He wrote film music, which uses these rules, so he had practice. But if you say about courage and unfamiliar styles you didn't get the message at all, sadly. If you start analysing this piece, you'll soon fiind out that there is a lot hidden. And you need to know Schnittke's style to decypher this code. He hides devil in every note of his composition. And he hid it well.
    Let me try and open  that curtain a bit.
    Pastorale, very beautiful sounding part actually hides a lot of death in the picture. Its like everything is good here where we are, nice weather, puffy clouds, birds, and somewhere else far away there's battle, and death, and destruction, and agony, but here it only echoes a bit, and you almost don't hear it, everything is almost perfect. Almost. Another interesting fact about this part is violin and piano often have two different main themes and they actually try to stumble each other. Sadly, you almost don't hear that in this performance, musicians try to smooth the conflict Schnittke puts there. It weakens this performance. I think, this performance did not grab Pastorale essense at all, sadly. They smoothen all those little hints composer put there up to the point, when listener can't hear it at all. Pastorale is supposed to end confusedly, without clear ending, because of two melodies tripping each other. It is put in the notes, but musitians miss it, so they never come to that ending themselves and don't lead listener. I think you should find other performances of Pastorale, that one is not very good, too loosy.
    The performance of the other parts is reasonable, though.
    Ballet is one of the most fun parts in usual classical suites. Old composers used to say, the longer the ballet the more fun for public. An Schnittke starts it fun. Theres dance, and ovement, and everyone is laughing and all is good. But then that movement becomes a bit mad and uncontrollable. And it doesn't look to scary right now. But then… oh… you almost don't notice it!.. violin's solo becomes horn call! That classical horn call, a sequene of intervals: sixth-fifth-third with upper note accending by one tone, so popular in classical music. Here it goes as follows: F-D, A-E, D-F. You'll find it in notation. So, they often use it as call to arms. And suddenly its not people dancing in Schnittke's ballet. Its guns, tanks, cannons. And now ballet becomes really scary. And if you notice this hidden lie that Schnittke puts in there, you will understand all horrifying meaning of that image that he draws for us.
    Minuet. A dance with a lot of small steps. Very comfortable, easy to talk during it… Schnittke puts so much spleen and depression into it. And he hides it well all the time, apart one, when it bursts out in a crazy scream of pain, because you can't leave like that anymore. And then tries to continue somehow.
    Fugue in classical music is a symbol of pure perfection, the most complicated and most advanced of all musical forms. Well, Schnittke very quikly makes his fugue a parody on itself, because it is just impossible to listen to so many repeats at the same time. I have very good audio card and awesome headphones. I can usually listen to any music, because all the good music has reason why people like it. I had high desire to stop listening to that Fogue all the time after the middle, because THERE CAN'T BE SO MANY REPEATS. I could barely listen…
    Pantomime is a finale, where Schnittke tries to respond to all problems he described and say something importaint and ask a question to the listener. I didn't decypher it yet for myself, I'm yet in the process of analysing, but what I'm finding out is barely describable by words. The only thing I can say, its about humans and the ways people see world. And that shows other parts of suite as lenses through which people interact with surroundings and their cons… And he tries to give some idea of his way of solving the problem.

    Reply
  • July 13, 2018 at 10:36 pm
    Permalink

    a very charming historic construction of Schnittke's. It must take courage to write in an idiom you do not practice every day as the old masters did.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *