Simplified Tai Chi 24 form (YMAA Taijiquan) Yang style by Liang, Shou-Yu



DVD available: http://ymaa.com/publishing/internal/taijiquan/tai_chi_chuan_24_48_DVD

In 1956, the Simplified (or 24 Posture) Taijiquan was compiled by the Chinese Sports Commission. Tremendous efforts were put into promoting Taijiquan. The 24 Posture Taijiquan was derived from the traditional Yang Style Taijiquan long form. It was the result of many Taijiquan masters working towards standardizing and simplifying Taijiquan, for use as a health promoting exercise. Many of the more complicated and repeated movements were deleted from the long form for ease of learning and practicing. The sequence starts off with very simple movements and gradually becomes more complicated. Even though the 24 Posture Taijiquan sequence is a simplified version of the long form, it is still a “traditional” sequence with the original martial applications in every movement.

It consists of 20 different postures from the Yang Style Long Sequence. Three of the postures are done on both left and right sides, and one of the postures repeats itself, making a total of 24 postures. Because this sequence is based on Yang Style Taijiquan, the training guidelines and principles of Simplified Taijiquan follow the characteristic “flavor” of the Yang Style. The entire Simplified Taijiquan sequence should be performed at an even pace with no abrupt changes in the transition, and following the guidelines and principles outlined in the Detail sections of this DVD and in the textbook ‘Tai Chi Chuan’.

The instructions are presented with as much relevant information as possible in the Detail Section. For beginners, there may be too many details to assimilate at one time. In classroom instruction, the instructor often tells students to only pay attention to one or two aspects of the sequence at a time. As students get better at the primary aspects of the sequence, the teacher will then introduce more aspects of the movements to the students. As you learn from this video, it is recommended that you do the same — focus on one aspect at a time. When you begin to learn the postures, don’t be overly concerned with coordinating your breathing with the movements. Once your movements are smooth, then start to pay attention to your breathing. Study the detailed guidelines and principles and try to incorporate them into the entire sequence.

Liang, Shou-Yu was born on June 28, 1943 in the city of Chongqian, Sichuan Province, China. When he was six he began his training in Qigong, the art of breathing and internal energy control, under the tutelage of his renowned grandfather, the late Liang, Zhi-Xiang. Mr. Liang was taught the esoteric skills of the Emei Mountain sect, including Da Peng Qigong. When he was eight, his grandfather made special arrangements for him to begin training Emei Wushu (martial arts).

DVD on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Simplified-Tai-Chuan-With-Applications/dp/B000BL02F6

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Fahad Hameed

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24 thoughts on “Simplified Tai Chi 24 form (YMAA Taijiquan) Yang style by Liang, Shou-Yu

  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Thank you. In addition to the excellent demonstration, film quality and pace, I appreciate the naming of each form.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Immense skill and grace! I have not seen such fluidity in other Yang practitioners in my area!

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Estoy muy feliz y agradecido con usted Sr. Liang por todo el beneficio que ha significado este libro.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    I'VE BEEN TOLD BY BOTH MY MASTERS AND STILL HAVE WHAT IS CALLED POETICAL GRACEFUL MOVEMENTS… TAI-CHI YEUNG STYLE, OF WHITE DRAGON STYLE.ERIC LYLE PELLETIER

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    anybody who thinks tai chi is not an effective martial art should take a swing at this guy

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    wow. he's amazing. thank you for posting this. watching this is inspiring. I hope to one day make it look half as easy as he looks when he's doing tai chi.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Thanks for the posting. In my research I have found no evidence that the 24 style form, also known as the Beijing Style 24 Taiji set, is a by product of the Yang Style Taiji. The Yang family does not recognize it as part of their lineage. It is a wonderful beginners form to learn, I just hope we can clarify its history. When the 24 form was created, a number of 108 long forms were practiced. This form was created to Incorporated all the styles of Taiji, not just the Yang Style. Remember, the People's Republic of China had no intention of supporting a Family clan when this routine was created. That would have shown preference to one style over another.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Do you have a posterior view?  I think that will make it easier to learn.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Thank you. This is very helpful and so beautifully executed. The footwork is particularly clear to see.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Head's up, lovers of the 24 form…a new video by Grandmaster Liang's daughter is coming soon.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    This gentleman is the most elegant Tai-Chi-Chuan exponent I ever saw. Poetry in motion.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    As much as enjoyed the smooth demonstration, I became just as captivated by the music used in the video.  Can you tell me what/who it is, please?

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Im confused about the yang style 24. If I'm learning this style via video tutorial until I can find the proper instructor, how do I tell the difference between the 108 set long form vs. the 24 set short?I want to learn the most popular one in China. Thanks for posting this.

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  • September 26, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    A wonderful demonstration! I find my left hand turns palm out/forward during single-whip, but other than that these are the movements that I teach. Thank you.

    Reply

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