Fahad Hameed

Fahad Hashmi is one of the known Software Engineer and blogger likes to blog about design resources. He is passionate about collecting the awe-inspiring design tools, to help designers.He blogs only for Designers & Photographers.

35 thoughts on “The Yellow Wallpaper PBS Masterpiece Theater 1989 part 8

  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    jennie is so kind to charlotte despite not understanding what's going on. i think she's an underrated character.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    He gives a lecture that every man & woman should have pleasure of free books and pictures, yet he deprives his wife of the very notion.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    The awful thing is; he actually loves his wife very much, he is no good for her, he has no idea.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Nice detail with the secondary doctor touching "Charlotte" so familiarly, and the pictures of troubled women taken while they are unable to fight. "She likes them"? Of course she does, you've got her on heavy opiates and/or lobotomized her.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    I saw this when it first came out on PBS. Well done, thought provoking. By the way; men are selfish, short-sighted bastards, still.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    What's with all the feminists on here? This is about the Oppression of women, not even close. If you knew anything about the author you would know that she suffered from mental issues and that's what the whole story is about. Although the author herself didn't have any hallucinations, she wanted to depict what it was not being allowed to have an emotional outlet. Back then doctors didn't know much about mental illnesses so they just told patients to rest. Not having an emotional outlet almost drove the author into insanity (but she decided to write, despite what her doctor said). The story was written to warn others that taking away the outlet would only cause the emotions to bottle up and was very harmful. There are multiple articles where the author herself explained her story.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    THIS IS NOT A STORY ABOUT THE OPRESSION OF WOMEN. This was based off of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's own personal experience. She had post-partum depression and her doctor prescribed that she have bed rest and not write. That nearly drove her insane like this, until her friend told her that if she needed a creative outlet then she should write. So she began writing again and got better. She wrote this story to show how this kind of treatment can be detrimental to women, hurting instead of helping. None of the male characters are actually supposed to be seen as jerks. Rather, they only wanted what was best for her but were misguided in their way of doing so. It was meant to be eye-opening, but not about oppression of women. Rather, the misunderstanding of what will help and what will hurt when a woman is going through this type of experience.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Her husband dictated what he thought was best for Charlotte. He did not listen to her, nor did he want to hear about her feelings, her emotions, he dismissed her feelings as rubbish.  The central theme is the subordination of women in marriage
    ' The conventional nineteenth-century middle-class marriage, with its rigid distinction between the “domestic” functions of the female and the “active” work of the male, ensured that women remained second-class citizens. The story reveals that this gender division had the effect of keeping women in a childish state of ignorance and preventing their full development. John’s assumption of his own superior wisdom and maturity leads him to misjudge, patronize, and dominate his wife, all in the name of “helping” her. Charlotte is unable to stand up for herself without seeming unreasonable or disloyal. She has no say in even the smallest details of her life, and she retreats into her obsessive fantasy, the only place she can retain some control and exercise the power of her mind.

    This story highlights powerfully the importance of self-expression
    The mental constraints placed upon Charlotte, even more so than the physical ones, are what ultimately drive her insane. She is forced to hide her anxieties and fears in order to preserve the façade of a happy marriage and to make it seem as though she is winning the fight against her depression. From the beginning, the most intolerable aspect of her treatment is the compulsory silence and idleness of the “resting cure.” She is forced to become completely passive, forbidden from exercising her mind in any way. Writing is especially off limits, and John warns her several times that she must use her self-control to rein in her imagination, which he fears will run away with her. Of course, Charlotte's eventual insanity is a product of the repression of her imaginative power, not the expression of it. She is constantly longing for an emotional and intellectual outlet, even going so far as to keep a secret journal, which she describes more than once as a “relief” to her mind. For Gilman, a mind that is kept in a state of forced inactivity is doomed to self-destruction.

    This story also highlights the Evils of the “Resting Cure”
    As someone who almost was destroyed by S. Weir Mitchell’s “resting cure” for depression, it is not surprising that Gilman structured her story as an attack on this ineffective and cruel course of treatment. “The Yellow Wallpaper” is an illustration of the way a mind that is already plagued with anxiety can deteriorate and begin to prey on itself when it is forced into inactivity and kept from healthy work. To his credit, Mitchell, who is mentioned by name in the story, took Gilman’s criticism to heart and abandoned the “resting cure.” Beyond the specific technique described in the story, Gilman means to criticize any form of medical care that ignores the concerns of the patient, considering her only as a passive object of treatment. The connection between a woman’s subordination in the home and her subordination in a doctor/patient relationship is clear also.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    I didn't really understand much besides the fact that both the husband & other doctor were assholes! 

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    This was actually a pretty good movie. 🙂 The book was better though.

    The whole thing's chilling to think about, especially if you consider what Gilman was referencing.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Book was way better, focused more on the wall being worn down from her rubbing up against it as she crawled the circumference of the room. The book was much more creepy

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Hm, I always thought that she had hung herself or murdered her husband at the end. Guess not.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    I don't know why but her blockading the door that way really made the ending a little less eerie than how the story showed it.  She was supposed to just lock the door.  I thought it was more eerie when she said quietly where the key was and to go get it and unlock the door.  I don't know why they chose to do it this way instead…  The film was good but some of the additions, and having less of her first person moments (since the whole story was in first person) really made the progression less enjoyable.  

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    LOL she got possessed by the evil dark lady 
    that lives in the creepy house…that was used for exorcisms !!!

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    in those days women were just mere chattel. a man's property, to be seen and not heard and not given any credit for being other than dutiful wives and mothers. the hipocrisy of his last speech to give the poor freedom of expression whilst his wife was denied it……….

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Could anyone explain the purpose of the girl riding the bicycle shown throughout the film? I don't remember that from the short story…

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Today's moderns society has no use for this rubbish. I know it is a supposed classic work of literature(so my college class tells me) but honestly today, society is numb to this type of work. There is nothing shocking, disturbing, gothic, or even mildly terifying aobut this. Stories of real life in the news every night are 100 times more disturbing than this or anything written in this era. Just lame by todays standards

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Pasted behind the walls of society with frills and fluff and norms, believes and patriarchy and papacy. The perverted and obvious context to female ecstasy sets the tone for none other than a male philosophy a male thesis. Then to dig your nails in through the yellow, through the "breakneck" and the deliciousness of finding the authentic self as others see it as sheer terror and mental illness. A better read in my opinion, but peaks my empathy also to "breakneck" Mrs Perkins, I thank you.

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    If you look it up Post partum depression from an actual doctor;s point of new currently when women were actually tested for year. To be the fact the societies around the world do not encourage and fear life actually enough to compromise the idea of "new life"
    That a woman is next to childhood from those of us robots who were abused obviously from childhood is mirrored at the female who carries a child-
    This very unusual form of depression comes from this currently as fact*

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Post partum depression is actually now recognized as the subconscious knowledge that society does not encourage babies. Actually this woman was separated from her self understanding becoming a different or different selves. To avoid that she was trained to compromise her self understanding and was not thought of as a human being. Thus the word "simple" used in this story compromising the very idea of individual entity as a human being because she was a woman. A woman / person without support

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    Thank you for uploading these. Very helpful and and enjoyable

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  • September 23, 2017 at 8:57 pm
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    we finished readin this story in our class but i have no idea with the ending. it makes me wonder and think a lot.

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